Mastering & Creating Your Final Mix Like the Pros (Mastering Process).

The mastering process enables you to perform final changes after you have actually mixed your multitrack recordings to 2 stereo tracks (we'll leave quad and 5.1 surround-sound scenarios for another day.) Some adjustments are made to enhance a particular song's sonic quality. Others are made within the context of an album - making sure that numerous songs strung together have a comparable sonic "consistency." Common areas of issue for a mastering engineer are: equalization (eq), compression, levels (volume) relative from one tune to the next, and spacing between tunes. Equalization: In some cases you'll want to change the eq or compression on a mix after you've done the final mix. Or you might have ten tunes mixed by three various engineers in five various studios.

Each song's eq might seem best by itself, but if you sequence them together, unexpectedly one song sounds too brilliant (or too dull ...). Tip # 1: remember that any eq modifications to your stereo mix affect the entire mix - if you desire to cut 3 db at 80Hz since your mix sounds muddy, keep in mind to check how that affects all the instruments (e.g. the vocal), not simply the bass guitar and kick drum. Compression: In mastering, this is used not simply to manage a mix or to add character, however likewise to "print" or send as much level to the master as possible without clipping the signal.

Spacing & Crossfading.

Spacing: there are various philosophies as to how one need to approach the spaces put in between songs on a record. Some feel the downbeat of one tune should fall at the start of a new bar, in the pace of the previous tune (to continue the flow.) Others believe you need to avoid this like the afflict, due to the fact that it decreases the effect. In the end, do whatever feels. There is no standard. Cross-fade your tunes if you like, or location six seconds between them. (2-4 seconds prevails in the majority of popular, non-classical records, but it's up to you.) Last tip: you may be inclined to master the exact same recordings that you combined, whether it is for financial reasons, imaginative reasons, or merely since you can. However we highly recommend that you get another person to master your task. The neutrality and fresh ears they bring to the table inevitably lead to a more powerful, more cohesive album.


Normal locations of concern for a mastering engineer are: equalization (eq), compression, levels (volume) relative from one song to the next, and spacing between songs. Or you might have 10 tunes blended by three different engineers in five different studios.

Each tune's eq might appear best by itself, however if you sequence them together, suddenly one song sounds too brilliant (or too dull ...). Idea # 1: keep in mind that any eq modifications to your stereo mix impact the entire mix - if you want to cut 3 db at 80Hz because your mix sounds muddy, remember to inspect how that affects all the instruments Hip Hop Beats (e.g. the vocal), not just the bass guitar and kick drum. Compression: In mastering, this is utilized not simply to control a mix or to add character, however also to "print" or send as much level to the master as possible without clipping the signal.

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